Tag Archives: hack

Hack: Inari to Basic Tee

Inari by named clothing, to me, is one of the best patterns ever. Not only do you get such a simple, sleek dress and top, but you can also hack this pattern every which way.

If you want to introduce someone to sewing, this is that pattern. Not only is it quick and easy, but its definitely a fashionable item.

Looking at my wardrobe, I decided I was in need of a good basic white tee to tie in a few pieces. Sometimes you need to take stock of your wardrobe, think why am I not wearing certain things more, and link them together with simple basics. Something about ‘dressing down’ a fancy skirt or even putting on a structures blazer over a simple tee is just really chic and effortlessly cool.

I knew I wanted an Inari like cuff on the sleeve, so I decided instead on drafting one, I would just use the Inari. I chose to use my bulk light jersey fabric. It is definitely the ultimate jersey tee fabric – Its very light, has a great drape and if you leave a raw edge, it looks amazing.

So How did it Sew?

Okay, so this tee, from beginning to end took about 45 minutes.

45 minutes from cut to on my body!

I did cut a few corners to make it how I wanted, but it shows things don’t need to take forever.

Whilst cutting it out, I simply folded the rest of the dress pattern to the length I wanted then cut out the fabric.  I was too lazy to even trace it, i just made do.   As I cut the side seam, it went from the armpit and fanned it out a couple of centimetres and followed the ‘bubble’ curve of the top. I also left an extra bit on the bottom so I had some playing room to tidy the hem.

A quick wiz though the overlocker and the top was almost finished. I ended up with the front slightly shorter than the back, but I think it has an edgy look. I tidied this up but using my ruler rotary cutter, the raw edge looks amazing, but only really holds together when cut neatly. I just tidied the dangley bits left by the scissors.

The hand sewing of the roll sleeve was a quick needle thread, and amazingly I fought the perfectionist in me, and it turned out not much different to how it would have if i had spent longer on it.

Overall, I am pleased as punch with this. I had intended to use it as a base to customise it by cutting it and distressing it, But now I love it too much as is.

 

Pattern Repeat: Helmi Hack

After purchasing the Suzy Mag Issue Two (I am so upset I got to the party late and didn’t get an Issue one) I have been very much inspired to attempt the Helmi again.

Sometimes you just need to be reminded that you have/love a pattern.  This is one of the reasons I love the online sewing community So (…Sew?) Much.  Its so inspirational with everyone bringing their ideas to the table.

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Picture from Suzy Mag Issue Two (see link at bottom for details)

The picture that struck me most was the long sleeve Helmi Hack in a gorgeous Liberty Tana Lawn.  Now, I am not one for having a Liberty Lawn just laying around, but I did have this beautiful Tropical Print in my stash.  It seemed a good substitute, yet in keeping with the original fabric tones and concept.  I had bought it purely as I loved the fabric, and had NO idea what to use it for… it was one of those can’t leave behind  purchases!

My Previous Named Clothing Helmi I had worn a lot, but could definitely use an updated version of, but not a complete replacement.  It’s one thing I love about sewing; just with a different fabric or slight pattern hack, or another collar/sleeve option and you have a completely different garment.

So How Did It Sew?

Date Completed: 8th May 2017

It was a lot more work than my first attempt, this was mainly due to the added hacks taking up a lot of thinking and planning time overall.  One issue I had was not knowing what Suzy mag had done on the back:  They said ‘optional storm flaps’.  In the actual Helmi pattern it is made almost as a waistcoat added into the garment.  After some internal debate, I decided that I was going to ignore the back of the storm flap part and just sew the front into the side seams.  I came to this conclusion mainly because if you look at the pattern, this back piece looks better/is designed for the shirt, as there is no waist seam as with the dress.  I didn’t want the flap, then the indent of the waist so close to look odd.  It made it a bit more fiddly, but I personally think it was the right step.

I didn’t really go for pattern matching, especially on the side seams.  I felt the Tropical pattern was at that size and fullness that I could pull off not matching it perfect.  Although, I did make sure the front flaps and collar were symmetrical, as well as both the arms being the same.

As suggested by the mag, a long sleeve hack is really simple to do.  I feel I have mastered a new talent of the sleeve placket now,  I drafted it from scratch and the extra care on this really makes this piece.

I love this dress – one thing I require for my summer wardrobe is light long sleeves (that can also be rolled up) One of the reasons I began this sewing journey was because I was unable to find specific things like this to buy in shops.

I can’t wait to wear this in regular circulation in my wardrobe, especially on holiday.

Also, check out Suzy Mag if you haven’t already.  It really is the best sewing mag out there, its so fresh and original, and full of inspirational articles.

My Pattern: Black Woven Ribbon Dress

When I want to repeat a pattern, I always try to make it as different in some way.  So taking Inspo from the spring fashion sneaking in, I wanted to emulate this Ribbon Insert style I have been seeing a lot of.  This seems quite an easy was to make something look completely different.

I wanted a more Aztec style trim, yet I fell in love with this Red and Purple Rose from Mokshatrim check them out, they have amazing Ribbon (the exact one I purchased doesn’t seem to be there at present)  I feel the Roses are more me, a bit more goth too, plus a hit of purple matches the hair.

I decided to Hack a Hack of a Sway dress:  I folded and cut the back piece, but with the front I did separates, plus a seam allowance.  This is because i wanted to attach the ribbon, then join then together to form the front.  I also raised the collar to get a more square finish, this also helps as I left the top part open to just above the bust and it sat nicely on the decolletage.

So How Did It Sew?

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(completed: 16th March 2017)

I sewed on the ribbon first, then carefully joined them just on the edge to form the front.  This was easier than anticipated, although it was done mainly through feeling the edge of the ribbon than by sight… Eeep! The V neck it forms at the front means that i can just slip this dress on over my head.

I had already hacked the sleeve for the sway pattern a while back, so I just used that to make the Bell sleeve with a ribbon insert hiding the join.

I love this dress, its very comfy and casual, It has a bit more of an Asian feel to it than a Boho one, but I think with a hat and some sandals I can work it.

Rip! Mod Dolly – Shirt Dress

This Dress has been forming in my mind for a while before it came to be.  But it was finding the perfect fabric combined with already making a good shirt dress that moved it on.

In my online fantasy shopping ( we all do it) I again looked at ModDolly.  I know that they have out sized me, but a lot of their styles lend themselves to flattering a plus size figure like mine, that’s why I love their stuff; The day they figure this out and make my size is the day I become very poor.

Already having copied their Black and white Peter-Pan collar dress (see here) I spotted this beauty and the plans started to form:

(photos from ModDolly)

I then found a brown plaid fabric, which was extremely similar to the Rust from Mod Dolly:  I spotted it on the end of a massive fabric shop, and chucked it in.  This piece was made off the back of a Grainline Alder shirt dress, so I decided to adapt and hack the pattern to make this:

So How did it Sew?

(Completed: 28th February 2017)

It was an easy Sew, considering I had just completed a Grainline Alder with sleeve hack, just before this one.  The only adjustment was the skirt:  I simply folded the front of the pattern at the required length and cut it out, adding a simple straight rectangle gather skirt to it.  I am a very Lazy sewer!

I love this cute little grungy Dress, I love the fabric as it has a soft light feel and it is extremely close to my original inspiration.  I am considering adding a belt to give it more structure as apposed to just being the kind of dress you chuck on.

Made By me: The Grainline Alder with Sleeve Hack

The Grainline studio is something i have had on my radar for a while, yet never actually got round to purchasing,  Yet after seeing Alder after Alder (both versions) on Instagram, I  finally took the plunge and got one.

The pattern itself is beautifully designed, I love the simplicity of it:  Block colours, simple line drawings – it’s a minimalist dream!  This continues into the actually paper pattern pieces.  I have to admit I do prefer a white paper for a pattern.  I am not saying that I hate the brown/cream/beige colours, I just love the crispness of a white, especially when they use a blue print too.  Pattern porn!

The instructions are simple and well illustrated – although I would suggest making the two versions more distinguishable, purely for the ease of coming back to reference the booklet whilst working,  But this is so minor it really doesn’t matter.

So how did it Sew?

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Completed:  30th January 2017

I really enjoyed this pattern, it was simple and easy and quick.  I used a shirt material with tiny burnout holes in it.  I am prepping for better weather, until them this can be layered!

I added sleeves as a bit of a hack for this.  I debated 3/4 length, but in a debate with myself I concluded that a full length can be rolled to a short, and still be worn under a cardigan ( i like the cuff to sit out the bottom of the cardigan sleeve, it looks neater to me)

I achieved the sleeve but tracing round the pattern to start making my own sleeve template… i then discovered, after a bit of a rummage, it was an exact fit for another sleeve I had previously drafted.  Gotta love that when it happens!

The buttons were meant to replace some on another project I had used basic buttons for, but I am not gonna lie, I couldn’t be bothered to cut them off an re sew! So I just used the fancy ones for this.  They really make the dress though, so I am really happy how they turned out.

I even like this dress done right up to the collar, which is rare, especially with gigantic boobs like mine I can sometimes look quite matron like without the open neck line.  But this is Super cute.

I cut this out in the largest size and it is the perfect fit for me.  The is a slight gap at the bust BUT, this happens on everything for me.  Again those pesky gigantic breast always making a bid for freedom.

Overall,  I LOVE this pattern, especially the version I did with the rouching on the side.  It is so flattering on me.  I am planning another in a plaid fabric (again with the sleeves)  I MAY hack it a bit more and do a full skirt instead of a button front… I will see where the fabric takes me.

p.s sorry for the sub-par pictures!  The lack of good lighting combine with the time I haven’t got to optimise that lighting means you are just getting some full mirror shots…. sorry x

HACK! – Long Sleeve Inari

My never ending love for the Inari has lead me down the path of long sleeves. I can’t say this was totally my idea, I have seen numerous attempts on Instagram. But this is my attempt and how I went about it…
So How Did It Sew?

Completed: October

It is a simple hack really, all I did was trace the sleeves down and thinned then out a bit (the original short sleeves are quite open) I followed the same cuff finish, but I did it on a much smaller scale.
Overall, i am really happy with the make, I chose a thicker grey marl fabric to make it have a slightly more sweat shirt like feel.
It does look like a very good basic now, without its sleeves it loses its Inari features, until you notice the bottom.

This was before my overlocker, which would have made it a faster make.

HACK! – Moneta with Longsleeve

Having made a few Colette Patterns Monetas, I decided I needed a full sleeve version.   I had some light grey marl left over from a cardigan. It was just enough (with a bit of a pattern wiggle) for a Moenta.

So How Did it Sew?

Completed: 7th June

Because Monetas are generally about 12 inches too long for me, so I pre-cut (as in folded the pattern hem) the skirt piece.   I scrounged back some fabric by doing this first.
The Moenta is a basic and easy make,made more easy by not including the lining, I skipped that as this is a real casual make.

I love this little dress, its everything I want from a skater style, even using up an end of fabric: something i tend to have quite a bit of.

Moenta is my go to skater dress, and tbh i really don’t see anything else coming close.